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Earth at Perihelion and Aphelion: 2016 to 2050

February 17th, 2016 by admin

Earth at Perihelion and Aphelion: 2001 to 2050

Greenwich Mean Time (GMT)

Year      Date/Time of    Distance     Relative to     Date/Time of    Distance     Relative to    Perihelion
           Perihelion                    Mean Per.       Aphelion                     Mean Ap.      Interval
2016     Jan 02  22:49   0.9833039 AU    2097 km      Jul 04  16:24   1.0167509 AU    6080 km     363.68 days
2017     Jan 04  14:18   0.9833094 AU    2919 km      Jul 03  20:11   1.0166756 AU   -5190 km     367.65 days
2018     Jan 03  05:35   0.9832843 AU    -845 km      Jul 06  16:47   1.0166961 AU   -2129 km     363.64 days
2019     Jan 03  05:20   0.9833012 AU    1681 km      Jul 04  22:11   1.0167543 AU    6590 km     364.99 days
2020     Jan 05  07:48   0.9832436 AU   -6935 km      Jul 04  11:35   1.0166943 AU   -2399 km     367.10 days

2021     Jan 02  13:51   0.9832571 AU   -4916 km      Jul 05  22:27   1.0167292 AU    2832 km     363.25 days
2022     Jan 04  06:55   0.9833365 AU    6973 km      Jul 04  07:11   1.0167154 AU     760 km     366.71 days
2023     Jan 04  16:17   0.9832956 AU     845 km      Jul 06  20:07   1.0166806 AU   -4444 km     365.39 days
2024     Jan 03  00:39   0.9833070 AU    2553 km      Jul 05  05:06   1.0167255 AU    2273 km     363.35 days
2025     Jan 04  13:28   0.9833274 AU    5607 km      Jul 03  19:55   1.0166437 AU   -9957 km     367.53 days
2026     Jan 03  17:16   0.9833021 AU    1815 km      Jul 06  17:31   1.0166440 AU   -9920 km     364.16 days
2027     Jan 03  02:33   0.9833335 AU    6513 km      Jul 05  05:06   1.0167289 AU    2786 km     364.39 days
2028     Jan 05  12:28   0.9833074 AU    2608 km      Jul 03  22:18   1.0166798 AU   -4566 km     367.41 days
2029     Jan 02  18:13   0.9832917 AU     270 km      Jul 06  05:12   1.0167127 AU     362 km     363.24 days
2030     Jan 03  10:12   0.9833418 AU    7758 km      Jul 04  12:58   1.0167227 AU    1848 km     365.67 days

2031     Jan 04  20:48   0.9832664 AU   -3516 km      Jul 06  07:10   1.0166882 AU   -3308 km     366.44 days
2032     Jan 03  05:11   0.9832469 AU   -6437 km      Jul 05  11:54   1.0167510 AU    6086 km     363.35 days
2033     Jan 04  11:51   0.9832989 AU    1350 km      Jul 03  20:52   1.0166936 AU   -2494 km     367.28 days
2034     Jan 04  04:47   0.9832893 AU     -89 km      Jul 06  18:49   1.0166703 AU   -5979 km     364.71 days
2035     Jan 03  00:54   0.9833249 AU    5238 km      Jul 05  18:22   1.0167406 AU    4539 km     363.84 days
2036     Jan 05  14:17   0.9833202 AU    4530 km      Jul 03  21:17   1.0166633 AU   -7033 km     367.56 days
2037     Jan 03  04:00   0.9832889 AU    -152 km      Jul 06  12:05   1.0166651 AU   -6753 km     363.57 days
2038     Jan 03  05:01   0.9833549 AU    9718 km      Jul 04  19:46   1.0166909 AU   -2904 km     365.04 days
2039     Jan 05  06:41   0.9833113 AU    3192 km      Jul 05  13:25   1.0166588 AU   -7700 km     367.07 days
2040     Jan 03  11:33   0.9832937 AU     557 km      Jul 05  19:02   1.0167271 AU    2517 km     363.20 days

2041     Jan 03  21:52   0.9833471 AU    8554 km      Jul 04  01:38   1.0166887 AU   -3235 km     366.43 days
2042     Jan 04  09:07   0.9833014 AU    1723 km      Jul 06  13:10   1.0166554 AU   -8212 km     365.47 days
2043     Jan 02  22:15   0.9832882 AU    -257 km      Jul 06  02:25   1.0167441 AU    5064 km     363.55 days
2044     Jan 05  12:52   0.9832896 AU     -44 km      Jul 03  15:24   1.0166960 AU   -2140 km     367.61 days
2045     Jan 03  14:56   0.9832653 AU   -3677 km      Jul 06  12:51   1.0166888 AU   -3210 km     364.09 days
2046     Jan 03  00:58   0.9833451 AU    8247 km      Jul 05  06:06   1.0167265 AU    2432 km     364.42 days
2047     Jan 05  11:44   0.9833216 AU    4738 km      Jul 05  06:32   1.0166728 AU   -5608 km     367.45 days
2048     Jan 03  18:05   0.9832818 AU   -1219 km      Jul 06  05:08   1.0167072 AU    -469 km     363.26 days
2049     Jan 03  10:27   0.9833342 AU    6626 km      Jul 04  09:06   1.0166722 AU   -5702 km     365.68 days
2050     Jan 04  19:35   0.9833060 AU    2411 km      Jul 06  01:57   1.0166285 AU  -12240 km     366.38 days

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Calendar of Celestial Events 2012

May 21st, 2012 by admin

  • January 3, 4 – Quadrantids Meteor Shower. The Quadrantids are an above average shower, with up to 40 meteors per hour at their peak. The shower usually peaks on January 3 & 4, but some meteors can be visible from January 1 – 5. The near first quarter moon will set shortly after midnight, leaving dark skies for what should be a good show. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Look for meteors radiating from the constellation Bootes.
  • January 9 – Full Moon. The Moon will be directly opposite the Earth from the Sun and will be fully illuminated as seen from Earth. This phase occurs at 07:30 UTC.
  • January 23 – New Moon. The Moon will be directly between the Earth and the Sun and will not be visible from Earth. This phase occurs at 07:39 UTC.
  • February 7 – Full Moon. The Moon will be directly opposite the Earth from the Sun and will be fully illuminated as seen from Earth. This phase occurs at 21:54 UTC.
  • February 20 – March 12 – Best Chance to see Mercury. The planet Mercury will be far enough from the Sun’s glare to be visible shortly after sunset. Mercury will reach greatest elongation from the Sun on March 5, reaching a relatively bright magnitude of about -1. This will be your best chance to see the planet this year.
  • February 21 – New Moon. The Moon will be directly between the Earth and the Sun and will not be visible from Earth. This phase occurs at 22:35 UTC.
  • March 3 – Mars at Opposition. The red planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun. This is the best time to view and photograph Mars.
  • March 8 – Full Moon. The Moon will be directly opposite the Earth from the Sun and will be fully illuminated as seen from Earth. This phase occurs at 09:39 UTC.
  • March 14 – Conjunction of Venus and Jupiter. The two brightest planets in the sky will be within 3 degrees of each other in the evening sky. On March 25 and 25, the crescent Moon will be near the two planets, creating a dazzling evening spectacle.
  • March 20 – March Equinox. The March equinox occurs at 05:14 UTC. The Sun will shine directly on the equator and there will be nearly equal amounts of day and night throughout the world. This is also the first day of spring (vernal equinox) in the northern hemisphere and the first day of fall (autumnal equinox) in the southern hemisphere.
  • March 22 – New Moon. The Moon will be directly between the Earth and the Sun and will not be visible from Earth. This phase occurs at 14:37 UTC.
  • April 6 – Full Moon. The Moon will be directly opposite the Earth from the Sun and will be fully illuminated as seen from Earth. This phase occurs at 19:19 UTC.
  • April 15 – Saturn at Opposition. The ringed planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun. This is the best time to view and photograph Saturn and its moons.
  • April 21 – New Moon. The Moon will be directly between the Earth and the Sun and will not be visible from Earth. This phase occurs at 07:18 UTC. Read the rest of this entry »

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Solar Eclipses: 2001 – 2010

August 27th, 2007 by admin

The table below lists every solar eclipse from 2001 through 2010. Click on the eclipse Date to see a map of an eclipse. Click on the Region of Eclipse Visibility to see a detailed description of an eclipse.

Solar Eclipses: 2001 – 2010
Date Eclipse Type Saros Eclipse Magnitude Central Duration Geographic Region of Eclipse Visibility
2001 Jun 21 Total 127 1.050 04m57s e S. America, Africa
[Total: s Atlantic, s Africa, Madagascar]
2002 Jun 10 Annular 137 0.996 00m23s e Asia, Australia, w N. America
[Annular: n Pacific, w Mexico]
2003 May 31 Annular 147 0.938 03m37s Europe, Asia, nw N. America
[Annular: Iceland, Greenland]
2004 Apr 19 Partial 119 0.736 Antarctica, s Africa
2005 Apr 08 Hybrid 129 1.007 00m42s N. Zealand, N. & S. America
[Hybrid: s Pacific, Panama, Colombia, Venezuela]
2006 Mar 29 Total 139 1.052 04m07s Africa, Europe, w Asia
[Total: c Africa, Turkey, Russia]
2007 Mar 19 Partial 149 0.874 Asia, Alaska
2008 Feb 07 Annular 121 0.965 02m12s Antarctica, e Australia, N. Zealand
[Annular: Antarctica]
2009 Jan 26 Annular 131 0.928 07m54s s Africa, Antarctica, se Asia, Australia
[Annular: s Indian, Sumatra, Borneo]
2010 Jan 15 Annular 141 0.919 11m08s Africa, Asia
[Annular: c Africa, India, Malymar, China]

Geographic abbreviations: n = north, s = south, e = east, w = west, c = central

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Lunar Eclipses 2001 – 2010

August 27th, 2007 by admin

The table below lists every lunar eclipse from 2001 through 2010. Click on the eclipse Date to see a map and diagram of an eclipse. Click on the Region of Eclipse Visibility to see a detailed description of an eclipse.

Lunar Eclipses: 2001 – 2010
Date Eclipse
Type
Saros Umbral1
Mag.
Eclipse2
Duration
Geographic Region of
Eclipse Visibility2
2001 Jan 09 Total 134 1.195 03h17m
01h02m
e Americas, Europe, Africa, Asia
2001 Jul 05 Partial 139 0.499 02h40m e Africa, Asia, Aus., Pacific
2001 Dec 30 Penumbral 144 -0.110 e Asia, Aus., Pacific, Americas
2002 May 26 Penumbral 111 -0.283 e Asia, Aus., Pacific, w Americas
2002 Jun 24 Penumbral 149 -0.788 S. America, Europe, Africa, c Asia, Aus.
2002 Nov 20 Penumbral 116 -0.222 Americas, Europe, Africa, e Asia
2003 May 16 Total 121 1.134 03h15m
00h53m
c Pacific, Americas, Europe, Africa
2003 Nov 09 Total 126 1.022 03h32m
00h24m
Americas, Europe, Africa, c Asia
2004 May 04 Total 131 1.309 03h24m
01h16m
S. America, Europe, Africa, Asia, Aus.
2004 Oct 28 Total 136 1.313 03h39m
01h21m
Americas, Europe, Africa, c Asia
2005 Apr 24 Penumbral 141 -0.139 e Asia, Aus., Pacific, Americas
2005 Oct 17 Partial 146 0.068 00h58m Asia, Aus., Pacific, North America
2006 Mar 14 Penumbral 113 -0.055 Americas, Europe, Africa, Asia
2006 Sep 07 Partial 118 0.189 01h33m Europe, Africa, Asia, Aus.
2007 Mar 03 Total 123 1.238 03h42m
01h14m
Americas, Europe, Africa, Asia
2007 Aug 28 Total 128 1.481 03h33m
01h31m
e Asia, Aus., Pacific, Americas
2008 Feb 21 Total 133 1.111 03h26m
00h51m
c Pacific, Americas, Europe, Africa
2008 Aug 16 Partial 138 0.813 03h09m S. America, Europe, Africa, Asia, Aus.
2009 Feb 09 Penumbral 143 -0.083 e Europe, Asia, Aus., Pacific, w N.A.
2009 Jul 07 Penumbral 110 -0.909 Aus., Pacific, Americas
2009 Aug 06 Penumbral 148 -0.661 Americas, Europe, Africa, w Asia
2009 Dec 31 Partial 115 0.082 01h02m Europe, Africa, Asia, Aus.
2010 Jun 26 Partial 120 0.542 02h44m e Asia, Aus., Pacific, w Americas
2010 Dec 21 Total 125 1.262 03h29m
01h13m
e Asia, Aus., Pacific, Americas, Europe

 

Geographic abbreviations (used above): n = north, s = south, e = east, w = west, c = central

Footnotes

1Umbral magnitude is the fraction of the Moon’s diameter obscured by Earth’s Umbra. For penumbral eclipses, the umbral magnitude is always less than 0. For partial eclipses, the umbral magnitude is always greater than 0 and less than 1. For total eclipses, the umbral magnitude is always greater than or equal to 1. 2Eclipse Duration is the duration of a partial eclipse. If the eclipse is total, the duration of totality is given in bold.

3Geographic Region of Eclipse Visibility is the portion of Earth’s surface where a lunar eclipse can be seen.

Blue Bar

 

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Today’s Space Weather

September 25th, 2006 by admin

Solar X-ray Flux


This GOES X-ray flux plot contains 5 minute averages of solar X-ray output in the 1-8 Angstrom (0.1-0.8 nm) and 0.5-4.0 Angstrom (0.05-0.4 nm) passbands. Data from both operational GOES satellites are included. Some data dropouts will occur during satellite eclipses. SEC alerts are issued at the M5 (5x10E-5 Watts/m2) and X1 (1x10E-4 Watts/m2) levels, based upon 1-minute data. Large X-ray bursts cause short wave fades for HF propagation paths through the sunlit hemisphere. Some large flares are accompanied by strong solar radio bursts that may interfere with satellite downlinks.

This page updates dynamically every 5 minutes.


Satellite Environment Plot

This plot combines satellite and ground-based data in an attempt to present an overview of the current satellite envionment (particularly at geosynchronous altitude). Although these data are of interest to the satellite community, they do not include all parameters and energy ranges known to be associated with satellite anomalies.

This page updates dynamically every 5 minutes.

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The Largest Structure in the Universe

July 28th, 2006 by admin

Filamentary structure in 3D. Image credit: SubaruClick to enlarge
Astronomers have used the Subaru and Keck telescopes to discover gigantic filaments of galaxies stretching across 200 million light-years in space. These filaments, formed just 2 billion years after the Big Bang, are the largest structures ever discovered in the Universe. The filaments contain at least 30 huge concentrations of gas, each of which contains 10x the mass of the Milky Way.

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